Train Your Puppy or Dog Today

 We are very proud to announce that Janis Crary has recently passed the exams as is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer-Knowledge Assessed and can test dogs for Canine Good Citizen.   Beth Hough continues her certification as a CPDT-KA.  

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Next class offerings

Classes, questions, private sessions, send an email to info@caninecompanion.us or call 877-360-5517. 

Registration form for these classes can also be found in the Classes Menu.

Huntington
Puppy 1 Tuesday  November 4                      6:00 to 7:00
Dog 1    Tuesday  November 4                       7:30 to 8:30
Puppy II/Dog II Wednesday October 29          6:00
Beginning Agility Wednesday October  22      7:30
Advanced Agility Monday October 20             7:30
Intermediate Agility Monday October 27         6:00
Fort Wayne
Dog 1 Monday October 20, Hope For Animals 7 – 8 p.m.
Puppy 1 Tuesday October 28, 7 – 8 Unity of Fort Wayne Spiritual Center
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If you have adopted your dog or puppy from a local shelter, ask about the class discount.

 

 

HELPFUL TIPS!

 

Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide. 

 KEEPING YOUR DOG SAFE USING DOOR BOLTING MANAGEMENT 

The First Plan Of Action Should Be…PREVENTION!

The best way to enhance your dog’s training not to bolt through a doors is to NEVER let them made a successful escape! Sounds obvious, but the truth is countless people and their guests have accidentally lete dog out the door, this gives the dog a taste of freedom that can be exhilarating, but very dangerous. The dog doesn’t know he could get hit by a car, get injured by another dog or other specie of animal, become lost, he may accidentally hurt children and if rushing towards them, at the very least he will scare not only the children, but there parents as well!  Lets say your dog escaped and got hurt, why doesn’t he then realize not to bolt the dog in the future?  It’s because dogs fail to associate their escape with the injury or fear they experienced once they realized they were lost.  The time length was just too long to make the association.

Remember how dogs learn. Any experience the dog finds rewarding is reinforcement for him to try and repeat the behavior that got him the reinforcement.  i.e. Dog bolts through doorway, you yell and the dog thinks you’re excited too! He runs off, is hit by a car, taken to the vet, has surgery to repair his broken leg and then… the next thing you know, he’s trying to bolt the doorway again, even with the cast on his leg!  Why?  Because all he recalls is the excited of freedom, great exercise, your screaming, all the sights and smells, how much fun and rewarding could life be?

Use Management – keep the dog from escaping by doing the following management. Teach all household members to not let the dog out.

  1. Before anyone places a hand on the doorknob, they MUST look around for the dog. KNOW THE DOG’S LOCATION!
  2. Before guests enter or leave YOU must be the one turning the doorknob, you cannot expect every guest to remember to know your dog’s location before touching the doorknob. BE REALISTIC WITH YOUR EXPECTATIONS!
  3. NEVER open that door until your dog is secured by someone holding his leash or collar, he is tethered to a secure object or he is in another secured room.
  4. You are holding your dog securely.
  5. The dog knows how to perform a solid “wait at the door until you have cued his release”.
  6. These steps need to be performed at all doors, even vehicle doors.
  7. To learn more on how to modify door bolting, contact us.

 

The mental stimulation that a dog receives when learning new behaviors will offset the lack of physical exercise he may not be getting because of bad weather!  Bark questions to: Canine Companion, 11652 North – 825 West, Huntington, IN 46750 or email info@caninecompanion.us

Canine Companion
11742 N 825 W HuntingtonIN46750 USA 
 • 260-344-1217

Shelter Dog Discount is Here!!

Little Bit in yard-from StaceyCanine Companion by Certified Trainers, LLC, is happy to announce a new discount offered to those who have decided to adopt and commit to a shelter dog or puppy.  Starting January 2014, if you have paperwork showing your dog or puppy has been adopted from an area shelter, we will give you a 10% discount on our outstanding classes.  We only use Positive Reinforcement because it works and it makes you and your dog happy with the results. 

Let us help you learn how to Positively communicate with your new four legged friend and how to help them through many of the issues that come with being a shelter dog. 

Call us today, visit us on Facebook or send an email to us. 

HAPPY PEOPLE, HAPPY DOGS

Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide. 

 ***We are now offering a 10% discount to those who have adopted a puppy or dog from a shelter, call the office or email for more information***

The critical socialization period for dogs is the first 14-16 weeks of his life.  During this time, everything that he encounters – or does not encounter – may affect how he reacts to things for the rest of his life.  The more people, dogs and new experiences he has now, the better he will adapt to new things as an adult.  All puppies need to meet lots of new people – and a wide variety.  Men of all sizes, men wearing hats and men with beards, men dressed up and men in casual clothes.  Women of all sizes women, women with long hair, women wearing glasses, women in gardening clothes with big brim floppy hats. Infants to teenagers, boys with noisemakers and girls on skates. Every meeting should be fun and kept brief for the puppy. You get the picture, the wider the variety of people, places and things now the more likely your dog will accept strangers and unfamiliar things later on.  Experts recommend puppies meet a minimum of 100 new people in the first 4-months of life.

 

You can socialize your puppy in many ways.  Plan a puppy party by inviting friends over to meet your new puppy.  Take your puppy with you while running errands; it’s surprising how many places welcome a cute puppy if you ask.  Take the puppy to friends and families homes or work places.  Until he is vaccinated, avoid places where stray dogs may roam.  All new encounters must be fun for your puppy, defining fun through the eyes of your puppy, not yours.  Bring along tiny treats so people can treat him when he meets them. He will soon associate meeting people with good things forthcoming, a tasty treat!

 

Older dogs make great family members and can learn quickly using the right approach.  Teaching a few basic behaviors such as sit and come will help him fit nicely into the family.

 

A positive puppy or dog class can be a great way to start with your new pet.  Look for a class offering off leash playtime for puppies.  This gives them a chance to meet and play with a wide variety of canine pals, which is an extremely important part of early socialization.  Clarify the class uses only positive reinforcement techniques.  Choker chains, pinch collars or physically forcing your puppy or dog to perform any behavior is not necessary, regardless of its age.  Ask questions before signing up for a class.  What are the trainers credentials, what techniques do they use and what equipment is recommended.

 

Tip of the week:  It is never too soon – or too late to begin training your dog.  No matter what age, you and your puppy or dog can benefit from a truly positive training class.

 

Bark questions to: Canine Companion, 11652 North – 825 West, Huntington, IN 46750 or email info@caninecompanion.us

 

 

 

Adopting an Older Dog

Announcing shelter dog discount for basic classes!!!

Call for more information!!

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Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide.

 

Adopting an older dog from either a shelter or rescue group can have great benefits.  Many people say they don’t want to get an older dog because they must have problems, but that isn’t true.  Many adult dogs are wonderful dogs whose past owners could no longer care for them and to their credit relinquished their dog in a responsible manner.  The truth is, even if you start with a puppy you may end up with a problem dog, there is no guarantees.  A dog’s breed tendencies and genetics could mean that if you do everything right, you could still have a dog with problems.  When you adopt an older dog, you may or may not have problems, but at least you will know right away and can work through them from the start.

 

Adopting from a good quality shelter or rescue group is the way to go; they will know your new dog’s characteristics and any potential problems you may face.  Good rescue groups and shelters will have taken the dog through a series of tests, seeing how he or she responds to children, scary situations and even normal day to day life.  They will provide you a good description of the dog’s basic personality and make sure the dog chosen will blend into your family’s lifestyle.

 

There are many rewards to acquiring an older rather than beginning with a small puppy.  The personality of the older dog is there for you to see.  Is he shy, friendly, fearful or just too rambunctious for the previous owners?  Many dogs end up in shelters or rescue groups, just because their former family did not realize how much energy and time a puppy would require.  Shelters are often full of dogs 1-2 years of age, just because the previous owners were not prepared for the energy of a young dog.  By the time you adopt him, he may be at the age that he begins to settle down.  Training can be done at any age, so if you find a happy untrained dog in a shelter, this may be the perfect dog for you.

 

Older dogs have gone through their puppy stage, which includes chewing on everything in the house and difficulty with housetraining.  I find that older dogs are often easier to housetrain than younger dogs, because their bladder control is much more advanced than a young puppy.  Their energy level begins to slow down somewhere between two and four years of age depending on the dog.  So if your family is looking for a couch potato dog, adoption may be the perfect answer for you.

 

Puppies are cute for only a short time, and it can be difficult to determine the personality of a puppy at a very young age when breeders want to send them onto their new homes.  Don’t rule out rescue dogs as an option to adding a new dog to your household.

 

Tip of the week:  Older dogs can be wonderful family pets, the old adage, “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” is wrong.  Dogs of any age can be trained using positive reinforcement techniques!  So choose a dog who’s personality fits your family, then find a positive reinforcement trainer to help you get the perfect dog for you!

Consider – When Ready To Adopt

 

Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide. 

 

Recently a client of mine told me she wanted to add a second dog to their household.  Suggesting she check with her local shelter or rescue groups I was surprised when she said; “No, you never won’t know what you’ll get.”  Frankly the opposite is true and by spending a little time with the dog you are considering to adopt you’ll know if he is shy, friendly, energetic or laid back.

 

Although puppies are adorable they have not developed their personalities.  Personality development is determined by genetics from both their parents, the actions of their breeder and by their few short months of life experiences.  Puppies are sometimes selected at 2-3 weeks of age and determining their adult personality is a guess at best.  At three months of age most of their personality traits are still not obvious; their traits are hidden behind cute irresistible faces and puppy breath. Their genetics and future experiences will have a huge influence on their adult behavior.

 

When considering adopting a rescue, there’s the option of spending time with the dog and learning about his personality, will he’ll fit in with your lifestyle.  The rescue group can provide insight to any potential problems such as, is he dog and cat friendly, what about children and men?  The more you know the better you can make an informative decision about what dog is right for you and your family.

 

Many dogs in rescue leagues are very friendly dogs, and although some may have been too rambunctious for their previous owners, their only real need is gentle training and guidance.  The majority of rescue dogs are 6 months to two years of age, still in their energetic stage.  The ever popular retrievers are great dogs and often people adopt a retriever puppy believing they will have a laid back dog that enjoys sleeping next to them while they read a book.  What most folks fail to realize is, that active puppy stage may last for several years.

 

If you are partial to a particular breed, you may be surprised to learn purebreds are available through shelters and rescue groups too.  Often your local shelter has many purebreds to choose from and of course they offer the ever loving mutts or as many now call them, the designer breeds.

 

Most dogs available for adoption have not been abused or neglected, but through no fault of their own, where unable to stay with their original family.  The dog might have been given up because of allergies, job changes, owner death or some other unfortunate reason.  The truth is, just because someone gave him up doesn’t mean he has behavior problems. There are many great dogs waiting for the right home. Do them and yourself a favor by adopting the unwanted.

 

Tip of the week:  The old adage “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” is not true.  Dogs can learn new behaviors at any age – whether you’ve adopted an 8-week puppy or a 15-year old dog. When a dog is physically and mentally capable of performing your request, they can learn it through positive reinforcement.

Christmas Puppies

 

Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide.  Offering true Positive Reinforcement Training.

 

 

Did you or someone in your family get a puppy for Christmas?  Did you know what you do with your puppy over the next few weeks may have the most impact than anything you will do with him in the future?

 

The critical socialization period for dogs is the first 14-16 weeks of his life.  During this time, everything that he encounters – or does not encounter – may affect how he reacts to things for the rest of his life.  The more people, dogs and new experiences he has now, the better he will adapt to new things as an adult.  All puppies need to meet lots of new people – and a wide variety.  Men of all sizes, men wearing hats and men with beards, men dressed up and men in casual clothes.  Women of all sizes women, women with long hair, women wearing glasses, women in gardening clothes with big brim floppy hats. Infants to teenagers, boys with noisemakers and girls on skates. Every meeting should be fun and kept brief for the puppy. You get the picture, the wider the variety of people, places and things now the more likely your dog will accept strangers and unfamiliar things later on.  Experts recommend puppies meet a minimum of 100 new people in the first 4-months of life.

 

You can socialize your puppy in many ways.  Plan a puppy party by inviting friends over to meet your new puppy.  Take your puppy with you while running errands; it’s surprising how many places welcome a cute puppy if you ask.  Take the puppy to friends and families homes or work places.  Until he is vaccinated, avoid places where stray dogs may roam.  All new encounters must be fun for your puppy, defining fun through the eyes of your puppy, not yours.  Bring along tiny treats so people can treat him when he meets them. He will soon associate meeting people with good things forthcoming, a tasty treat!

 

If you received an older dog for Christmas, don’t fret.  Older dogs make great family members and can learn quickly using the right approach.  Teaching a few basic behaviors such as sit and come will help him fit nicely into the family.

 

A positive puppy or dog class can be a great way to start with your new pet.  Look for a class offering off leash playtime for puppies.  This gives them a chance to meet and play with a wide variety of canine pals, which is an extremely important part of early socialization.  Clarify the class uses only positive reinforcement techniques.  Choker chains, pinch collars or physically forcing your puppy or dog to perform any behavior is not necessary, regardless of its age.  Ask questions before signing up for a class.  What are the trainers credentials, what techniques do they use and what equipment is recommended.

 

Tip of the week:  It is never too soon – or too late to begin training your dog.  No matter what age, you and your puppy or dog can benefit from a truly positive training class.

 

Bark questions to: Canine Companion, 11652 North – 825 West, Huntington, IN 46750 or email info@caninecompanion.us

Keeping Holidays Happy for You and Your Dog

Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide.  The lead trainer is a graduate of Purdue University’s DOGS! Program and has earned the title of Certified Pet Dog Trainer through the Association of Pet Dog Trainers

 

Family gatherings around the holidays can be fun, exciting and stressful.  This goes for the family dog as well as the rest of us.  Noise, confusion and changes in routine can be nerve-racking for our dogs.  Even a normally calm dog can become agitated enough to bite under extreme conditions of boisterous family get-together with each adult thinking that another family member is watching the children and dog.

 

Take a few precautions to ensure everyone enjoys this holiday season.

 

During the most hectic times of the party – when guests are arriving and leaving, or during dinner, put the dog in his crate or another room with a special chew bone.  If possible, have someone take him for a walk while the guests arrive, so he does not become overly excited as people arrive and the chaos begins.  Do your best to have guest not interact with your dog for the first 20 to 30-minutes after their arrival. After this time period if your guests still feel they must interact with the dog insist they do so using low level stimulation. These include slow speech with a low tone of voice, no direct eye contact, no quick petting, no hugging and no kisses are given and your dog will thank you for it. Guests are notorious for raising their voices and greeting the dog excitedly. Of course, what follows is the dog reacts in an equally excited canine manner, but the dog’s excited welcome is not appreciated. Honestly, what’s a dog to do? Be your dog’s advocate and protect him or her from all well meaning, but excited guests!

 

Assign one person to be in charge of the dog.  Watching him for signs of stress or nervousness, and protecting him from unwanted attention by guests, especially children.  Children are at most risk for being bitten, after all its an especially exciting time of year!  They want to hug and kiss the dog, but don’t allow it.  Even if the dog tolerates this type of affection under normal circumstances, he may not tolerate it from strangers or known visitors when faced with high stress situations.

 

Dogs give off many signals when they find themselves in stressful situations.  Assign one person to watch the dog and be sure that person knows the warning signs. A few of these signs are, the dog turns his head away from the greeting guest, He licks his lips (many then people refer to this as “giving kisses”, begins yawning, eyes darting from side to side or attempts to walk away, some dogs will jump upward in an attempt to escape or even try to hide under furniture.  He may freeze and stay very still, or stare directly at the person who is bothering him and even growl or snap. All in an attempt to try and keep himself safe.  If this happens, the dog should gently be removed from the situation and not punished, he is just communicating his feelings to people who are failing to recognize his body language, which is the only way dogs can communicate.

 

If you already know your dog is uncomfortable with visitors, new to the dog or not, adults and/or children, consider having the dog spend the day in a kennel or with a neighbor.  If you decide to keep your dog at home, but away from the party, be sure he has plenty to do.  Lots of special chew items and favorite toys.  He will still hear the sounds of the party if locked in another room, and this too can be very stressful for your dog.  If you plan to have your dog secured away in another room, make sure he is comfortable spending time in this room while you are home and things are quiet.  Begin now, by having him spend a short time in this room while only the family is home.  Give him special treats and chew toys only when he is alone in his safe room.  Start with short periods of time and gradually increase those times.

 

We think of our dogs as part of the family and naturally want to include them in special events, especially Christmas.  This is a human emotion and may not be in the best interest of your dog, or your guests.  No one wants to have their holiday ruined by a dog biting an overly friendly child or adult.

 

Tip of the week:  Taking a few precautions long before the guests arrive will make certain everyone has a good holiday season.  This consideration should include the family dog!

 

When and How do I Peacefully Let My Pet Go?

Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide. 

 

Q:  My dog is 15 yrs old, her eyes are cloudy and she is almost deaf.  She is obviously growing older.  She likes long naps instead of long walks.  Once a furious eater, now she’s finicky and requires soft food because many teeth have been extracted.  She’s been a wonderful friend, how do I know when it’s the right time to let her go?  How do I make such a difficult decision, and what are my options of how to perform this last act of love?

 

A:  This is one of the most difficult decisions any loving pet owner will make and it needs to be based upon what’s best for the animal.  One veterinarian explained it this way.  Choose two or three of your dog’s favorite things to do.  For example my dog loves to go outside and bark for a couple minutes, going for car rides and even with missing teeth, she still enjoys mouthing and licking a flavorful chew bone.  Of course your dog’s favorites may be quite different. My pet’s doctor has suggested that when these favorite things no longer are important to your dog, it will be time to ask your veterinarian for his professional opinion.  Veterinarians have a lot of experience and can best provide facts concerning your dog’s overall health and comfort level.  You may even be pleasantly surprised to learn your dog is doing fine and your concerns were premature.  If you do feel that your dog’s quality of life is too diminished, however, your veterinarian can help you ease her death.

 

The traditional way is to make an appointment and take your animal to your veterinary hospital for a peaceful transition referred to as euthanasia.  You can choose to be with your pet or remain in the waiting room while caring hospital staff assists your pet’s passing.  This decision should be based on what is best for you; you are the only person who can make this decision. The other option, which is growing in popularity, is to request that your veterinarian come to your home, using the same procedure used at the animal hospital.  This may be more comfortable for the animal and for you as well.

 

Finally you will choose what to do with the body.  Pet cemeteries allow for a brief ceremony and for graveside visitation. Cremation has become very popular with many pet owners.  Urns come in a variety of designs and many people place a favorite picture of their pet alongside as a way of honoring and remembering their pet. You can also let your veterinarian dispose of the body.

 

Sadly, those who have not experienced the loss of a loved pet often do not understand the tremendous grief that accompanies it.  This can cause some people to hide their grief and even feel guilty for these feelings!  Never feel guilty and do not hide your grief. Instead, work through it by shedding tears, talking to people who have also loss pets and can identify with your loss.  Grief is normal when a loved pet is greatly missed.  There are pet grief counselors ready and prepared to help you work through your loss:  please don’t hesitate to call one.

 

Tip Of The Week:  An animal with bad breath can be a sign of gum disease and/or problems with their teeth, if your pet suffers from this contact your vet and have it checked out.  Until then, keep those tails a waggin’.  Bark questions to: Canine Companion, 11652 North – 825 West, Huntington, IN 46750 or email info@caninecompanion.us

They No Longer Want The Dog

 Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide. Along with their combined 30 years experience and endorsement by national organizations, the lead trainers are graduates of Purdue University’s DOGS! Program and have earned the title of Certified Pet Dog Trainer through the Association of Pet Dog Trainers.

 

It happens all too often. The decision is made you can no longer keep your dog. It may be due to a move, a death in the family or your dog’s personality does not fit your family lifestyle. A few weeks ago, someone brought a dog to the local Veterinary Clinic, which is also one of our training locations. She had been found walking down a county road. She was emaciated, stained with urine, but with tail wagging. One of our trainers decided to care for her until a healthy weight was achieved and a good home could be found. This stray continues to be a loving, happy dog. She loves sitting on your lap and sleeping next to someone at night. The only apparent abuse is the fact she was most likely dumped in the country, where she nearly starved a painful death. We’ve seen many similar situations. Owners who can no longer keep their dogs and cannot find them a new home. Owners who died, or entered a nursing home and their families don’t want their dogs. Far too often people literally dump the once family dog in the country believing for some odd reason the dog will live off the land. The truth is, almost all dogs dumped in the country or city, die. Dogs cannot “live off the land”; they do not wonder upon a good home and live happily ever after. Their realty is starvation, injury resulting in a slow painful death or they become some other predator’s ticket for survival. It is only the very, very few that are found, cared for and re-homed. So many irresponsible owners are embarrassed to relinquish their dog to the local animal shelter or a rescue group. As trainers we hear, “we don’t want our dog to be put down so I won’t take him to the shelter”, but these same people are willing to let their dog painfully starve, be injured or eaten by another animal. It makes no sense to the responsible pet owner. There are many shelters and rescue organizations willing to take unwanted dogs. Most shelters have drop off facilities allowing people to drop their dog off after hours, which lets the person remain anonymous. If your shelter doesn’t offer after hours drop off then for the sake of your dog do the right thing and take him during the shelter’s business hours. Most of us, having to find a new home for a dog is a very difficult decision and we would only give our dog to someone responsible. Unfortunately for others, dogs are disposable and these are the people who dump their dogs along a road or in some wooded area. Please be responsible if you must get rid of a dog. There are many rescue groups waiting to help you, accepting small, big, purebreds and mixed breeds. Shelters and rescue groups do a remarkable job finding good homes for thousands of dogs. Relinquishing a dog to a shelter is far from an automatic death sentence. Shelter and rescue staff, match the right home with the right dog, cat, or any other relinquished animal. Dumping an animal is as close as you will ever come to rendering your pet the automatic death sentence. When looking for a dog, cat or any other animal remember the animal shelters and rescue groups. There are wonderful animals waiting for you to take them home.

Tip of the week: When you can no longer keep a dog, or a family members dog. Look for local animal shelters and rescue organizations to help you find them a new home. We write about dogs, but it is the same for cats, pet rats, bunnies, ferrets, etc. No animal should ever be dumped, because its owner chooses to be irresponsible.

Fear Factor – Dog Version

Canine Companion conducts dog training classes in Fort Wayne, Huntington and surrounding communities and behavior consulting nationwide.  Along with their combined 30 years experience and endorsement by national organizations, the lead trainers are graduates of Purdue University’s DOGS! program.

 

 

There is a popular television show where contestants are asked to do daring stunts or eat disgusting things for the chance of winning a large amount of money.  For what price would you be willing to eat sheep’s brain?

 

This same premise can be applied to dogs.  Most dogs do not like to have their toenails trimmed – offer them a hard, dry dog biscuit and they are still not willing to sit still for a nail trim.  Just like people, they may have their price.  Try feeding your dog hot dogs or liverwurst and maybe he will be more agreeable to enduring a nail trim while eating a tasty treat.  Some dogs will need to begin with baby steps.  They will allow you to touch their toes in exchange for a tasty tidbit.  Working up to seeing the nail trimmers, while receiving the payoff.  Eventually allowing their nails trimmed in exchanged for the tasty treat.

 

What is routine maintenance to we as dog owners – bathing, grooming, cleaning ears & nail trims – can be torture to our dogs.  By paring the daunting task with something really good, dogs may be willing to endure, and eventually accept what needs to be done.

 

Paring something the dog does not like with something he does, as (food) may take time and will need to be done slowly.  One dog worked with, hated to have his nails trimmed, he growled, bit and fought as soon as he saw the nail trimmers.  Our treatment program included the owner place the nail trimmers on the floor next to the food bowl and the dog elected not eat for 2 days, but then gave in and ate his meals along side the feared nail clippers. In time, the owner could touch the dog’s feet while holding the nail trimmers and eventually they were able to trim the dog’s nails while he received his tasty payoff.

 

Young puppies are the easiest to begin making such a positive association.  Handle your puppy’s feet, ears and body while they are eating their puppy kibble.  They may begin enjoying this type of touching.  Feed tasty tidbits the first several times you brush them, trim their nails or clean their ears.  Take tasty treats with you when you go to your veterinarian.  Many puppies will continue to nibble on bits of cheese and fail to realize they have just been vaccinated. 

 

The more painful or scary event your dog undergoes, the better the payoff will need to be.  Your puppy or dog may be willing to have their feet touched while eating their dog kibble, but when it comes to an actual nail trim, try liverwurst.  Find your dog’s price – remember fear factor – you may be willing to eat sheep’s brain in exchange for $1000.00, but I would require a much higher payoff.

 

Tip of the week:  Do not think in terms of dog food vs. people food.  A dog will only think of it as people food if it comes directly off your plate.  The dog will not begin begging at the table if you have given him bites of hamburger while receiving a nail trim.

 

Bark questions to: Canine Companion, 11652 North – 825 West, Huntington, IN 46750 or email info@caninecompanion.us